by Kristen Powers, Eyewitness News

Kern County voters will face three pot initiatives on the November ballot. This KCSO provided photo shows marijuana plants found during pot busts on May, 24, 2018.jpg

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KBAK/KBFX) —

The November election is nearing and when voters hit the polls they will notice several marijuana measures on the ballot.

The initiatives look to overturn the current ban on commercial growing and selling of medical and/or recreational marijuana around Kern County.

A “yes” vote would overturn current laws. A “no” vote would keep the current ban.

Depending on where you live, you will get to vote on two or three pot measures.

Countywide, in unincorporated Kern County and within city limits, voters will see “Measure J,” known as the Medicinal Cannabis Measure. Voters will also see “Measure K,” known as the Kern Regulation and Taxation of Cannabis Act of 2018.

Those two measures deal with Kern County laws.

In addition to Measures J and K, Bakersfield voters will see Measure O.

In order to pass, a measure must get 50 percent of the vote, plus one.

In the county, if J and K both get more than 50 percent of the vote, the one with the most votes will become law.

MEASURE J

  • Deals with medical marijuana in unincorporated Kern County
  • Allows and regulates commercial medical cannabis cultivation, manufacturing, testing, retailing, distribution, and micro-business in the unincorporated areas of Kern County
  • Does not limit the number of dispensaries
  • Activity is subject to state licensing requirements
  • Allows county officials to impose a perpetual 7.5 percent business tax on the adjusted gross income of such activity
  • Recreational dispensaries would still be illegal in Kern County
  • Submitted by the Kern Citizens for Patient Rights

MEASURE K

  • Deals with medical and recreational marijuana in unincorporated Kern County
  • Allows and regulates commercial medicinal and recreational cannabis retailing, testing, cultivation, processing, packaging, and distribution in unincorporated Kern County
  • Activity, except testing and selling, would be restricted to two areas off of Interstate 5
  • Activity is subject to state licensing requirements
  • Imposes permit fees on cannabis businesses
  • Allows no more than 35 dispensary permits
  • Allows county officials to impose a perpetual 5 percent annual tax on gross receipts of dispensaries
  • Submitted …read more